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20131101
20131130
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ALJAZAM 73
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)
. it was awesome. i don't know if he's being sarcastic. another viewer, our son attends a technical high school. there is a culinary program. the food served there is best than most food in the country and most people don't have that. >> yes, one staffer said that he could opt for whole plate of french fries for lunch. >> we want to serve great food, but we want to serve great food that they're eating because they know academics success is tied in to the nutritional choices they make every day as well as whathe choices we make every da. >> the school lunch program is the country's second largest foot anfood nutrition program. they creased the availability of fruits, vegetables whole grains while reducing sodium and certain fats. some schools are turning to salad bars and chefs for the new meals. it cost $13 billion a year and some question the influence the industry after learning like items like pizza sauce counts s a vegetable. some schools dropped the program stating that students tossed the healthy options right into the trash cans. how could we have quality meals. let's go to julie, works
happens. they don't like to city people of coo color in front of their houses and they call the police and the police come and they have to respond and they take the people to jail. it's a brutal situation right now even toted to the extent whe the city has sweeps going on every morning at 4:30 am accompany the by duw trucks who are spragu spraying people down from the middle of the night. check out my website. it says welcome to the jungle the largest homeless camp is right in the heart of silicon valley. you have yahoo and larry page he is home and the silicon jungle. >> i'm afraid that the rising rent costs are going to drive people out to the suburbs and here we have a residential of the bay area. it's joey. >> my name is joey and 93 years ago my great grandfather moved from i had lee an i italy and he started a del drestaurant here and it's been going for 93 years and my father got into the business and as of this year under i unfortunately it went under. my father has been out of work since then and it's been hard on my family. >> mari maria let's talk about the longterm effects
people benefiting monetarily happens to be the university. and at this point in time, i don't think -- especially with you being able to leave and enter your profession before you get a college degree from that university, i -- i don't think that, you know, scholarship is a fair compensation for the sport. >> ed you filed this class action lawsuit against the ncaa. why did you do that? >> initially it was to right a wrong. i thought that the way that it is structured, the way that the rules are now is -- is just bad. and i think when you look at it as a -- at a society standpoint, everyone seems to be compensated for their abilities except for the student athlete, and i just thought it was time for a change. >> ed just to follow up on that. we have a tweet . . . do you think this is something that should be able to connect with people simply like there is fundamental unfairness here. why do you think so many people don't see that it way? >> well, it's been the way that it is for so long. i think a lot of people are just scared to change, scared of change. i think if -- you know, you
news online. don't forget to go there 24/7. aljazeera.com. american dream. >> from mcmansion to tiny houses is a growing movement here in the u.s. where people are trading in big to live small. one, the tiny house movement has hundreds of members, and one community said it's a very charmer concept and they learn more about it, and the reality starts to sink in. >> this is not a new phenomenon. this is a 1920s house on wheels. and check this out, this is a washington d.c. 140-foot square-foot house. and looking cheesy there, but our community says: >> >> well, you have a lot of truck? >> but where's the bathroom? >> we're going to find out. since 1970, the average house size has doubled remains but for some, bigger is not better. >> i guess that the aspect of a small house is freedom. the world gets a lot bigger when you're living small because i can afford to do a lot more things in terms of cash and time. the whole world is now my living room. >> the living small movement doesn't stop at tiny houses. microapartments are popping up in many areas from seattle to new york city. but c
. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >>> welcome back. we're talking about college athletes and whether they should get paid. before the break we asked about athletes. tim these student athletes receive scholarships to attend school and play their sport. studies show between their scholarships, room, board, coaching, training, these students athletes get packages worth between 50 and $125,000 a year, why is that not enough? >> and they participate in the benefits of the athletic facilities, and the marketing opportunities they get for participating on tv. nonetheless they are arguing that the ncaa are using their names and likeness to profit and compensation. >> there is a national collegiate study that found out wha
on the philadelphia city paper, our activist, shiron snyder, and a history teacher in philadelphia. these things don't happen overnight, and they're not the result of one person. so walk us down the road that you think got the philly school district into this current mess. >> well, it's really a long-running crisis in the fact that large school systems like philadelphia, have a large fon-white student body have have been underfunded for years, and enormous cuts, and we have seen in the last ten years, the state control of the philly schools, the state took over a decade ago, and the rapid expansion of charter schools, and for each student that enrolls in charter schools, that costs the district an estimated $7,000. so the rapid unchecked growth of charter schools, combined with the enormous cuts to public education, under republican governor, tom corbett, has made an unfair situation catastrophic. >> you work in three schools in the city, and give us your perspective. how is it affecting the parents, the kids, your colleagues. >> well, i've been lucky enough to be in three different situations. one
's not a dorm room. too high a price and no room. and steven, i don't think that i could do 100 square meter but i would lik but -- i'd like to get down to 250. it's ridiculous, living larger, but a lot of our community members, what are the challenges of living in such a small space? what would you say the key challenge is? >> i think that the challenge is staying on top of what you own and all of the stuff that you really need. i would like to stay in my own home, i either wear it or use it. and we all have so much stuff. if you add it up, the cost of everything, it's amazing what we don't use. most of our closets are filled with this clothes that we don't wear, and we see people who don't have as much as we do, and everybody wants to keep buying more, but i think that wanted challenge is knowing what you want out of life. so the experiences, not all of the stuff, that's where your priority should be, and living in a small space, that's it. >> derek, when you started getting into this, did you find that it was hard to wrap your brain around it, and was it a new way of thinking? >> i grew u
of this conversation, and don't forget to tweet us at the hashtag that you see on the screen right now. >> albuquerque is set to vote on this issue next tuesday, and if passed, it bans pregnancy after 2 20 weeks except in cases of rape or incest. three have bans, but albuquerque would be the first in the united states to approve such a ban. the ban would be felt statewide, as albuquerque is the only city in new mexico that offersbortionings offersabortion at or after 20 w. who should have a say? tonight, joining me. lila rose, and tara bresler, the editor of think progress, who has been covering this for a while. and antoinette, a professor in albuquerque. and is this the first time about watching ajam stream, we're all about access. we use google and i'm going to start with you, as mentioned in july, texas joined 12 other states that approved a ban on abortion after 20 weeks of pregnancy, and what does the vote in albuquerque mean for the statewide legislation? >> well, albuquerque is the only city that has a clinic that will do these midterm abortions at 20 weeks, and if they're successful, the clin
, and that's one question we don't have an answer to right now. one japanese doctor said the radiation released by fukushima in just five months is like 29 hiroshima atomic bombs. if you are trying to imagine how much that is, it is more than enough to fill yankee stadium to the brim. but 43% of children in that area show thyroid abnormalities, the diagnoses, called a2. >> a2. [ speaking japanese ] >> while most parents forget about kids forgetting their lunch, in japan, it's if they remembered to pack their radiation detectors. [ speaking japanese ] >> it's a standard accessory for a lot of kids near that area. it has been nearly three years since the disaster, and it seems that the bad news continues to mount. optimistic estimates put cleanup at about 40 years. so what are the continuing impacts of fukushima's radiation, in japan and the world? she's a fukushima native, where she and her family live. and marco is with saving children from radiation, and she has worked for 42 years to educate the public about the medical hazards of the nuclear age. and radiation expert, dr. robert
-- >> if you don't mind, united states is an ally that is helping pakistan's economy, and it ease war against terrorism, but it is an enemy in the case of drones killing innocents. and then we with have same say they were never our friends and never will be. and then first world says pakistanis from an international rate society of religious extremists. i want to get your comments on this, the founder of the terrorist group, openly hosts popular rallies. bin laden was found a mile from military come pound, and many people say that pakistan government is harboring extremists. so what is your response so the contention that it is the drone strikes in. >> well, look, i think the drone strikes are on -- i agree with her in a narrow sense. drone strikes have increasingly taken to united states to difficult territory, in the feelings with pakistan. because now it is the case of the parliament of pakistan, the prime minister, and i think some significant portion think that it is a violation of their territorial sovereignty, whereas in the past we had private arrangements to continue this, now i thin
. robin says i'm a descendant of the chippewa tribe. we don't care what they call their american football team. we as people are raising children and grandchildren who will not let this type of racism go on. name change may not happen this season or the next but it will happen. finally melissa says, people are so sensitive these days. it's just football. find out a way to help the native american people. >> turning on a football team carries on weight. picking up the fight with their change the mascot campaign. everyone from nbc sports analysts bob costas to president barack obama have weighed in. how do native americans feel? >> i'm not a caricature or a mascot. >> i am not a caricature or a mascot. >> i'm not a caricature or a dead relic of the american past. i'm a human being. >> we are human beings. change the name. >> change the name. change the name. >> change did name. >> change the name. >> that is a video made by one native american. who rallied others to speak out. not all native americans dislike the name or even care. who should decide if the washington redskins should change
. don't miss a special america tonight live town hall tonight 9 eastern on al jazeera america. >> i'm phil torezz, coming up next on techknow. >> hike! >> america's favorite sport is under fire. >> now, that impact simulated 100 g's of acceleration in your brain. >> it's the opponent no player can see. >> so the system is showing real-time impact. >> can science prevent concussions? >> i did my job and just had to sacrifice my brain to do it. ♪ >> taking a page out of "argo," an fbi sting has put the spotlight on california legislation. it focused on a power. latino lawmaker. the senate president and the chair of the latino legislative caucus appear in the affidavit, and while nobody has been charged with anything, what do you think the implications could be here? >> i think it -- you know, what you are going to see is probably some people within that caucus trying to distance themselves from the calderons, and i think what you are also going to see is some people in the grassroots trying to -- trying to make a move and -- and maybe possibly unseat -- unseat this political family,
is happening on the other side as well. i don't see it's just a republican problem. i see this as an elite versus we the people problem. for example, raising the debt ceiling again. your typical conservatives knows taking out a credit card is not the way to keep your credit in check. and most americans understand that simple fundamental principle. so those in washington, d.c., they republican or democrat telling us, you know, this is the way it has to be done, we are kind of starting to scratch our heads and say, i don't know if we are buying what they are selling any more. >> gina, communities are chiming in about what is a moderate republican and what's extreme . melanie says it has gone too far right. it's hard to keep supporting them but i don't want to support the democrats either. >> prosser gives an example of moderate, rand paul, ron paul, gory gaffer johnson. gran gam ling says this is driven by the religious right. it's the church that needs to evolve. henry on facebook says it isn't about marriage. it is the gay community want for everyone to accept their lifestyle as normal. ge
and you don't know what it's like to pick yourself back up, you will not be ready for that adversity. >> so the son of mel brooks and an ba bancroft raised a priviled life for you. what was that moment like for you. it was a strange dichotomy. i had everything i never had to work and i was kurs rs kurs curd with dyslexia. my night was stooding to get a c plus and it made me comfortable with hard work. knowing i had to dig in and bjork threworkthree tiles timesy next to me. my brain was not built for this world. that was my childhood. >>> we have our community coming in talking about zombies. it's a hoar a herd mentality. those that follow talking media and don't follow their own brains need something to survive. it's a consequence of our own making that use us ir uses ourss against us there is a shift in how they are being used in 1968. we were talking about this before the show. we saw the rise in the 0' 70s ad now we have the last 13 years. 28 days later and the walking dead. what do they signify now. >> i think they are a different congress and different writers are using them for
tribe. the chippewa tribe. we don't care what they call we don't care what they call their american football team. their american football team. we as people are raising we as people are raising children and grandchildren who children and grandchildren who will not let this type of racism will not let this type of racism go on. go on. name change may not happen this name change may not happen this season or the next but it will season or the next but it will happen. happen. finally melissa says, people are finally melissa says, people are so sensitive these days. so sensitive these days. it's just football. it's just football. find out a way to help the find out a way to help the native american native american people. people. >> turning on a football team >> turning on a football team carries on carries on weight weight . . picking up the fight with their picking up the fight with their change the mascot campaign. change the mascot campaign. everyone from nbc sports everyone from nbc sports analysts bob analysts bob costas to president costas to president barack obama have weighed
... >> there is a huge opportunity for al jazeera america to change the way people look at news. >> we just don't parachute in on a story...quickly talk to a couple of experts and leave... >> one producer may spend 3 or 4 months, digging into a single story... >> at al jazeera, there are resources to alow us as journalists to go in depth and produce the kind of films... the people that you don't see anywhere else on television. >> we intend to reach out to the people who aren't being heard. >>we wanna see the people who are actually effected by the news of the day... >> it's digging deeper it's asking that second, that third question, finding that person no one spoken to yet... >> you can't tell the stories of the people if you don't get their voices out there, and al jazeera america is doing just that. ♪ >> taking a page out of "argo," an fbi sting has put the spotlight on california legislation. it focused on a power. latino lawmaker. the senate president and the chair of the latino legislative caucus appear in the affidavit, and while nobody has been charged with anything, what do you thin
revealed, i don't know if it surprised him and it didn't surprise me. everything that he revealed, it was common sense. but the key aspect is the credit cards. it's not the first time that a company has been hacked for political reasons and snow stolen credit cards. >> that's not correct at all. the hack took place before jeremy yam into it. and the credit cards were released before he came into it. he pled guilty for that, but jeremy never released any credit card numbers, or did he ever anything. >> but he was part of the group who did, but is he culpable? >> it should be taken into account that he did not use those credit cards nor reveal them. accomplish? >> well, he has been very explicit about what he was aiming to accomplish in his plea statement. he was hoping to accomplish a public service in illustrating what was otherwise kept from the public, which is how intelligence agencies with corporate backing and corporate intelligence agencies carry out vast amounts of surveillance and spying, and i totally disagree with andrew, there are many things that the hack reveals. such
that we're experiencing right now? >> that's a great question. the simple answer is we just don't know. we would like to think over the last few decades it's been largely attributable to too little exercise or eating too much food. and certainly they probably do play some role. but we have to consider the fact that from a calorie basis alone, the amount of extra energy we would take in on a daily basis or remove on a daily basis if we become less active, only amounts to about 10 cal rirs a day to result in the epidemic. to look at someone who might be fat and assume they don't exercise as much as a thin person or eat a bad diet or certainly an unhealthier diet than a thin person is a wrong assumption. it's not based on any kind of really solid evidence. >> glen, we've had some criticism on our community this is not a war on quote unquote fat people but a study of bad health. obesity has ramped up health care costs by $147 billion. what's your response virgie about that? this is an attack on a health epidemic? >> i would call into question that claim. what essentially ends up happening is b
. the simple answer is we just the simple answer is we just don't know. don't know. we would like to think over the we would like to think over the last few decades it's been last few decades it's been largely attributable to too largely attributable to too little exercise or eating too little exercise or eating too much food. much food. and certainly they probably do and certainly they probably do play some role. play some role. but we have to consider the fact but we have to consider the fact that from a calorie basis alone, that from a calorie basis alone, the amount of extra energy we the amount of extra energy we would take in on a daily basis would take in on a daily basis or remove on a daily basis if we or remove on a daily basis if we become less active, only amounts become less active, only amounts to about 10 cal rirs a to about 10 cal rirs a day to day to result in the epidemic. result in the epidemic. to look at someone who might be to look at someone who might be fat and assume they don't fat and assume they don't exercise as much as a thin exercise as much as a thin person or eat
and in this situation are never complete in terms of making us certain that the they don't theo out and pursuing vigorously nuclear weapons in the future. if we are serious about diplomacy there is no need for new sanctions on top of the sanction that's are already very effective and brought them to the table in the first place. now if it turns out they can't deliver and they can't come to the table in this way and get this resolve and the sanctions can be ramped back up and we have that option. roger it's his birthday. happy birthday. >> back to healthcare. can you guarantee to the americanamerican people that the is going to be operational by november 30th. and secondly more broadly this is your signature on domestic legs. legislation. you hear on the hill that--is that how this mess came to be? >> i think thi there is going te a lot of there is going to be a lot of evaluation of how we got to this point. and i'm assuring you i have been asking a lot of questions about that. the truth is that this is number one, very complicated. and the website itself is doing a lot of stuff. there are not a
don't want to say i had an advantage. but i had the experience of growing up with a mother and a father and two moms, and impircly, i could say that my relationship with my two moms was far better than the relationship with my father and my mother. and my relationship with my father was non-existent, not because of my mom but thaws of him. and to sit there and say that there's? ethical boundary or scene that we're keeping children from their biological parents is also a very limiting view. it's not taking into account the other biological parent who chooses not to be in that child's life. it's not taking into account circumstances, death. a number of things like family dynamics are different. they're not contingent on sexual assault. and children are able to find their gender roles other places. i found it with teachers, and my friend's parents, and my brother. i was able to find those influences. i was not hurt by not having my dad in my life. >> you have touch odd the critical question in the community. whether or not there should be at least one gender parents, and we h
steps away from that historic location, instead is definitely a moment that many year don't want to miss. >> heidi thank you very much. they say it is cliche to say a picture is worth a thousand words but that particular image spoke volumes. mark snyder is at annette straus park. what is the situation where you are? >> i have got to tell you, dell, the crowd is so small at this point, you can count it. i counted 35 people in the crowd. they have chairs out for more than a thousand. but it's not lack of interest here in dallas. it's just we have gone from 60 to 70 degrees days, to boom, wind chills in the 20s now, and i think a lot of people that don't have tickets have decided i'm just going to watch at home. but the people with the coveted tickets of course are filling dealey plaza. but this is about a mile from dealey plaza, and they have big screens set up so people can watch the entire ceremony. one of the big moments will be at 12:30 central time, a moment of silence right at the time that president kennedy was shot, and that will be followed by church bells tolling all over town. >
about what consumers can do, and we see it all over twitter today. i love avocados, and i don't want to support criminals of what do i do? >> i love my guacamole in the super bowl. >> cocaine, heroin and now avocados, criminals are looking for new ways to make money. in the past, they turned to limes, but in the western state they are finding that money does grow on trees. avocados are more lucrative than marijuana and that has the cartel tightening its grip. they're skimming profits in avocado growers, a move criticized by a rival cartel. pash [ speaking spanish ] >> the citizens are starting to take matters into their own hands, forming militia groups to protect local growers, and the military has also stepped in, but it has little affect on farming communities being affected by what are being dubbed blood avocados. a journalist is investigating how they're tabbing into the industry, the mexican bureau chief, at yale university where he studies management. and the author of the last narco, he has been covering it for years. and the technologies like skype and google, it's not alwa
they have grown so big and people don't dar care anymo. it's giving so many dams about users experience and customer support and building a product is that people genuinely love. when you are a up start you are going up against incoupl incou . you are glad that one person liked the photo you took. >> let's do 80's pop culture. a delorean what will social media look like and what low read it be. the site ras has doubled every r now. it will be a truly international platform 230 for on-line communs to share links. >> peer report came out saying that read it is the most popular among hispanics across the state. it's most popular among hispanics and we started to dig into this and reeled liese reale thousands of communities not just geographical around language that we have not tapped into. in my travels i meet so many people that use old school news form and even janker than read it software. twitter has been great to get ephemeral news to the world. read it can bring out the big discussions. i think it will be a big push. hopefully we'll drop the social off social media. and anyone of us
, we told our story, but at the end of the record, we said, you younger guys don't have to do this. nowadays in america, the guy tells his story about being a drug dealer like its good. and america celebrates it just because he's making money. we created hiphop so we didn't have to have more drug dealers and gang bangers. we created hiphop so he wouldn't think it was cool to name himself after scarface, the movie, or the gangsters. we created the stories, but also gave positive, constructive alternatives. i was on the radio one time. and the guy calls in, and he says yo, dmc, just finish your saying -- this is powerful -- just for your saying, be cool, go to school. i'm dmc, the place to be. i go to st. john's university. after 12th grade i went straight to college. this guy calls, when you said that, you gave me a good problem. >> i said, what do you mean >> he said, i had the adidas and the gold chain, and the money and my bag of weed and my bourbon, and stuff like that, but here goes my idol dmc, saying school is cool. he said i had everything material, but i didn't have an educ
what it always did, but the problem is, you don't get it on mtv or on the radio. what you get on the radio and what you get on mtv now is basically what sells. iced tea told me a long time ago, the record companies are only in the business of selling records, so if the worst record ever made sells, and people are going to buy it, they're going to forget about what's important. they're going to forget about what's creative. and they're going to forget about what's revolutionary and groundbreaking. because to the record companies, it's a wednesday. but i always say this. with or without the record companies, there's going to be hiphop. hiphop started before we were able to play the radio or get deals. rappers did what we d but the whole reason we were mcs, our job was to be responsible to the audience, to separate from the old school to the new school. another person's creativity, it's what they do, but the defense in my generation and run dmc, public enemy, krs1, kujy rap. sonic, and ll cool j, the beastie boys, fresh prince. the difference between those young rappers now, and
. spencer. >> well, government-to-government diplomacy is never going to go away, first of all. and i don't envy those at the state department that have to engage in cultural diplomacy, when it is extremely hard to measure the outputs. to find out what the u.s. gets back from it. at the same time, the kind of investment that the united states makes to use an example of sending african american jazz musicians overseas, necessarily contrasts with the realities of what the u.s.'s civil rights record was at the time. and certainly it becomes something that looks less credible in the minds of a lot of foreign publics, when the u.s.'s actual face looks extremely militaryized. and it's very difficult to overcome that. >> spencer our community is coming in here. here is howard . . . willow you are at the fault line here. you are a very well-known writer. you speak arabic and have an egyptian husband. oftentimes do you feel the burden of being a global cultural ambassador who has to bridge the dieds? >> i try not to think about it in those terms. in order to make good art, one has to be true first
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 73 (some duplicates have been removed)